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Mandii Pope – Stormy

Introducing stormy sponsored by Anglia Restaurants Castle Carvery Racecourse, designed and painted by Mandii Pope.

Underneath the all protective Stormtrooper armour protecting his heart, Stormy is painted as Smaug the treasure dragon from the Hobbit.

Sponsored by Castle Carvery Stormy This rouge fiery Smaug Stormtrooper Dragon follows in the footsteps of Darth Vader and the evil Emperor Palpatine with great plans to take over the universe with his grand army of Stormtroopers.

Kiwi Artist Mandii Pope, has held exhibitions in Europe and the UK, including significant solo exhibitions in Cork Street London and Dubai. Many works are in private and commercial collections internationally.

Mandii has close links with many charities often donating works to fundraise for various causes around the globe.

Public Art includes: A 15ft Big Ben BT Artbox for Childline’s 25th Anniversary sponsored by Channel 4, 5ft Darth Vader Gorilla for the Great Gorilla Public Art project. Yoduck @DuckYoda for the Grand Norwich Duck Race, Agatha Christie Hercule Poirot and the Greenshore Folly, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, An Elephant for Breakfast Bookbenches for Books about Town London and Buckingham Palace Bus for TFL (Transport for London – The Year of the Bus) Moa and the Longest Girink in Town Giraffe for Christchurch Stands Tall, and  a NZ flag tiki Egg for the Big Egg Hunt NZ.

Live Art: Painting in 2 hours of Buckingham Palace for the King Edward VII Hospital Sister Agnes, Painting Clarence House for Waitangi Day at NZ House (painted in part by HRH The Duchess of Cornwall).

Her style is versatile, such as Cityscapes, Beach Landscapes, Nudes, Fantasy, Pop Art, Abstract, Spin Art, Illustration and a touch of 80’s retro Kiwiana patriotism.

Specialties: Cityscapes, Beach Landscapes, Pop Art Portraits, Fantasy Art, Spin Art, Contemporary, Abstract, Kiwiana, Nudes, Illustration, 3D Sculpture, Circular Canvas

Mandi’s Website

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Stormtroopers were the elite soldiers of the Galactic Empire. Like Imperial-class Star Destroyers and TIE fighters, stormtroopers served as ever present reminders of the absolute power of Emperor Palpatine. These faceless enforcers of the New Order were considered an extension of the Emperor‘s will, and thus they often used efficient yet usually unreasonable tactics as a way to keep thousands of star systems throughout the galaxy in line. At the height of the Empire, stormtroopers had effectively become symbols of major authority. With few exceptions, they were distinguished from all other military units by their signature white armour.

The Imperial stormtroopers were the evolution of the clone troopers of the Grand Army of the Republic. By the end of the Clone Wars in 19 BBY, the Galactic Republicwas reorganized into the first Galactic Empire. As a result, the Grand Army was reformed into the Stormtrooper Corps and the clones were renamed “stormtroopers.” Under the Empire, stormtroopers operated alongside Imperial Army and Navy units, and some were stationed on Naval ships where they served as marines. Although the Corps was overseen by Stormtrooper Command, a military agency that was independent from Imperial High Command, all stormtroopers ultimately answered to Emperor Palpatine with unconditional loyalty and subservience.

 

Members of the Rebel Alliance SpecForce had several slang names for stormtroopers, including whitehats, plastic soldiers, snowmen, The Boys in White, bucketheads, plastic boys.” Another term was “Stormies,” often used by Wedge Antilles and Corran Horn.

Although the deaths of both Emperor Palpatine and Darth Vader in 4 ABY caused the collapse and fragmentation of the original Galactic Empire, stormtroopers were retained as elite soldiers under several successor states, such as the Imperial Remnant, the Second Imperium, and the Empire of the Hand. By the year 138 ABY, stormtroopers still existed in two Imperial states: the New Galactic Empire of the Sith Lord Darth Krayt, and the “Empire” of the exiled emperor Roan Fel

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